Edmonton fire crews rescue dog swept away in fast-moving river

Edmonton fire crews rescued a dog Sunday morning that had been swept away in the surging North Saskatchewan River. Fire groups got a call soon after 10 a.m. from a lady whose canine had fallen in the stream east of the Walterdale Bridge.

The hound was borne downstream by the quick moving current. The stream is running high and loaded up with garbage following a few days of downpour. Fire salvage teams sent a salvage vessel and figured out how to cull the canine from the water six minutes later.”We unequivocally support Edmontonians (and their pets) to remain off the stream and away from the waterway banks,”

fire representative Brittany Lewchuk said in an email. “At the point when water levels rise this quickly, joined with an expansion in flotsam and jetsam coasting in it, it is risky for anybody to be close to it and particularly on it.

This incorporates our firemen.” Edmontonians were cautioned Friday evening to avoid the stream banks following two straight long periods of downpour. Fire teams got a call soon after 10 a.m. from a lady whose pooch had fallen in the stream east of the Walterdale Bridge

.The hound was borne downstream by the quick moving current. The stream is running high and loaded up with flotsam and jetsam following a few days of downpour. Fire salvage teams sent a salvage pontoon and figured out how to cull the canine from the water six minutes later.

“We emphatically support Edmontonians (and their pets) to remain off the stream and away from the waterway banks,” fire representative Brittany Lewchuk said in an email. “At the point when water levels rise this quickly, joined with an expansion in trash gliding in it, it is perilous for anybody to be close to it and particularly on it.This includes our firefighters.” Edmontonians were warned Friday afternoon to stay away from the

river banks after two straight days of rain. The city said water levels could rise as much as three metres over the ensuing 48 hours. Several river valley trails flooded and were closed as a result.

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